Tag Archive | tesco

Reputation managment 2.0

pikeroonAre you a fat pikey bastard? Yes?

Then presumably, you shop at Primark (or Primani to the chattering classes that love a bargain).

Well, they are the latest brand to launch a staff investigation after several hapless employees posted some less than flattering comments about their beloved customers on Facebook.

Some nuggets included: fat, pikeys, and twats.

Primark will launch an investigation into the comments, but they are the latest brand to do so (Virgin, BA, Tesco, Waitrose to name but a few).

In this day and age, surely no right minded individual would post any negative work related comment on a social networking page? Knowing that once it’s up online, its there for the world to see, and could come back and haunt them at any point in the future…

Well, factor in minimum wage and less than amazing working conditions, and it goes some way into explaining why numerous brands suffer at the hands of frontline staff.

However, this latest incident yet again highlights the importance of social media guidelines for employees.

All staff (in brands big and small) need to be aware of the potential damage their harmless / bitter / outright slanderous comments on social media sites can do to their paymasters reputation.  And ultimately, it can cost jobs…

Primark have generally done well in the social space. Their non-official facebook fan page was widely heralded as a marketers wet dream, something they mined easily with a truly engaged audience.

But, how (if at all) have they / do they engage their staff?  Does company HQ actively engage, listen to, and respond to the frontline staffs gripes, aches and pains? Are they able to voice their concerns beyond the shop floor supervisor? Or, do they feel their only outlet to vent their rage, is a public forum…

Sweatshops aside, this presents the brand with a genuine opportunity. A timely staff engagement programme wouldn’t go amiss. A few t-shirts with some choice slogans from the staff might also help put a positive spin on this in the press.

It’s unlikely this’ll put off many customers from shopping with the brand. If they can get past the sweat shop production issues, it’s unlikely they’ll mind this little slur against their good name. And I’m sure ‘Fat pikey twat’ t-shirts would sell by the truckload.

After all, sticks and stones…

Iain Morrison is a senior marketer in the British Tourism Industry. And would like to remind you all to be careful with those tweets / status updates!

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Facebook climbdown…

spy

spy

It’s embarrassing.

For a brand that empowers its users in such a way they can instantly unite against against the ‘enemy’, issue a rallying cry to the like-minded and deploy the troops with amazing speed, you’d think facebook would know a lot better than to try changing the privacy rules by the back door…

I managed a textbook case of this in 2008 (when an international bank with local aspirations their ads would have you believe), and they did what most big brands chose to do. Ignore the facebookers, they can’t damage my brand, it’ll blow over in a few days. Against all my advice, the brand dug in, only to suffer at the hands of the mobilised minority.

After it hit the BBC 6 o’clock news a day or two later, a rather hasty about turn was arranged…

So facebook. A brand that provides the very battlefield, that truly gets the potential of 2.0 (having harnessed it from day one), should have known better than to bite the hand that feeds it. That of its users.

A foolhardy situation the board should have seen coming a mile off. An alienated user base will now watch its every move, and cry foul the moment they put so much as a privacy related foot out of line.

It wasn’t a smart move, deletion of a profile in the users eyes means everything comes off. A brand that prides itself on the sense of ‘community’ it facilitates really shouldn’t have scored this type of own goal, however great the need to further monetise the site is…

The privacy battle will rage on.

But I can’t help but feel if brands use consumers personal data to bring information / content / advertising / offers to them that is of genuine interest, they won’t mind a jot…

After all, it worked for Tesco…

Iain Morrison is a senior marketer in the British Tourism Industry. And would encourage brand managers to watch what happened to facebook. It’s probably happening to your brand right about NOW!

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