Tag Archive | facebook

New Facebook ad. And chairs…?

So. The much heralded Facebook ad they release as they hit the 1 billion mark.

When you compare it to the Google work, it’s sorely lacking in emotion. And considering Facebook are master facilitators in the social space, it seems an odd move to disable comments on their Youtube channel…

C-minus Facebook. Please try harder next time…

Iain G. Morrison won’t be rushing out to buy shares in Facebook. Quite yet…

Facebook at work?

So, Diesel extend their ‘Stupid’ campaign to Facebook. And if my boss happens by, I’ll be sure to let him know how many ‘likes’ I’ve posted in the past hour…

Iain G. Morrison actually does get paid to spend time on Facebook. So take that Diesel…

 

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Facebook: Making breaking up easier to do…

So. Breaking up is hard to do? Not according to this lovely little graphic doing the rounds, courtesy of the very visual David  McCandless.

Dump me...

Dump me...

We all know there are insights lurking around, buried somewhere amongst the mounds of data we stockpile. But sometimes, ‘visualising’ them can really drive the point home (something that will obviously be little comfort the next time you get dumped by your heartless former beloved  just before Santa is due his visit).

So for any potential lady or gentleman dumper out there thinking the nights are drawing in and it really is time to lose the baggage. Please, do your best to remember. Two weeks before Christmas is ok.

But during the Christmas holidays is just ‘too cruel’…

Iain G. Morrison is a senior marketer in the British Tourism Industry. And Is wondering if this little infographic was sponsored by Kleenex. Helping the dumped the world over.

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If any homebuilders are reading…

… and would like to do something similar where I could win a house for free, please do give me a heads up!

Nice simple stuff from Ikea.

More and more brands are finding ways to connect with audiences in the social space as their confidence (and internal skill-sets grow). Expect to see much more of this sort of work in 2010…

Iain Morrison is house hunting. And HATES estate agents…

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Reputation managment 2.0

pikeroonAre you a fat pikey bastard? Yes?

Then presumably, you shop at Primark (or Primani to the chattering classes that love a bargain).

Well, they are the latest brand to launch a staff investigation after several hapless employees posted some less than flattering comments about their beloved customers on Facebook.

Some nuggets included: fat, pikeys, and twats.

Primark will launch an investigation into the comments, but they are the latest brand to do so (Virgin, BA, Tesco, Waitrose to name but a few).

In this day and age, surely no right minded individual would post any negative work related comment on a social networking page? Knowing that once it’s up online, its there for the world to see, and could come back and haunt them at any point in the future…

Well, factor in minimum wage and less than amazing working conditions, and it goes some way into explaining why numerous brands suffer at the hands of frontline staff.

However, this latest incident yet again highlights the importance of social media guidelines for employees.

All staff (in brands big and small) need to be aware of the potential damage their harmless / bitter / outright slanderous comments on social media sites can do to their paymasters reputation.  And ultimately, it can cost jobs…

Primark have generally done well in the social space. Their non-official facebook fan page was widely heralded as a marketers wet dream, something they mined easily with a truly engaged audience.

But, how (if at all) have they / do they engage their staff?  Does company HQ actively engage, listen to, and respond to the frontline staffs gripes, aches and pains? Are they able to voice their concerns beyond the shop floor supervisor? Or, do they feel their only outlet to vent their rage, is a public forum…

Sweatshops aside, this presents the brand with a genuine opportunity. A timely staff engagement programme wouldn’t go amiss. A few t-shirts with some choice slogans from the staff might also help put a positive spin on this in the press.

It’s unlikely this’ll put off many customers from shopping with the brand. If they can get past the sweat shop production issues, it’s unlikely they’ll mind this little slur against their good name. And I’m sure ‘Fat pikey twat’ t-shirts would sell by the truckload.

After all, sticks and stones…

Iain Morrison is a senior marketer in the British Tourism Industry. And would like to remind you all to be careful with those tweets / status updates!

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Public Service Announcement: Facebook

So, how’s your facebook etiquette?

Happy facebooking. And remember, once it’s up online, it’s there for all the world to see…

Iain Morrison is a senior marketer in the British Tourism Industry. And loves a good facebook break up…

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Going in for the kill…

Don't throw eggs at John...

Don't throw eggs at John...

No, not the unstoppable right hook courtesy of  John Precott (who has clearly been inspired by Obama, given his recent impressive utilisation of the full 2.0 arsenal in order to resurrect his political stature), I am referring to this summers predicted unstoppable musical force, La Roux…

The ‘lets get ravey’ version of La Rouxs’ ‘Going in for the kill’ track is a must for any dance music aficionado’s that spent their weekends in the 90’s having it large.

And even though New Labour have been slow to mobilise themselves digitally, Prezzas blog is worth a punt ( if you get time). His facebook status updates are also genius!

Enjoy…

Iain Morrison is a senior marketer in the British Tourism Industry. And is currently practising his big fish, little fish, culminating in a rather nifty cardboard box…

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Growing pains…

growing pains are never easy...

growing pains are never easy...

So, twitter is growing up. And Facebook is preparing to fight back…

We had the ‘first love’ moment, when Facebook courted Twitter. They danced round each other, the future looked rosy. Then, they tweeted off their separate ways…

We had the onset of puberty when charging business users was floated. It went down very badly…

Immediate statements to the contrary were hastily issued. On top of this, Facebook has decided its time to fight back. It doesn’t like twitter cannibalising what it sees as its web traffic. So a more tweet like ‘real time’ changes are expected to be rolled out across facebook shortly…

And now, the growing pains really kick in. Desparate to monetise the site and find a model that works for them, Twitter plod on. However, some good news came their way today.

Omniture have rather handily announced it has added a feature to its web analytics product that allows marketers to measure brand activity on twitter.

This feature will allow marketers to take advantage real-time, making it possible to send emails or SMS messages to mobile devices based on pre-determined criteria (e.g. a massive spike in brand related terms).

Great in moments of PR crisis. This will no doubt split opionion of the tweeters, but for now, great news for marketers…

Iain Morrison is a senior marketer in the British Tourism Industry. And can be found tweeting if you go a hunting for @igmorrison

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Ryanair 1.0

ryanair

Many brands (and marketers) struggle to grapple with the true reality of digital marketing. 

In a landscape that’s ever changing, with technology improving daily, consumers constantly seeking our new and exciting ways to interact with each other (and manage their relationships with brands), the pace of development to some can be daunting. To others, exhilarating…

For any of you reading this that work in marketing and feel as though you could do with dusting down your digital skill set, head over to the IAB  (Internet Advertising Bureau) who run some great seminars and training courses to help brand owners (and agencies) deal with the ever changing playing field. Best part, is they are free to advertisers and members…

One marketing department that could do with popping over for tea and biscuits with the chaps over at the IAB is Ryanair, who have two big negative PR stories in the press this week. A ‘so what’ for brands under the old rules, but as we know, the old rules of brand management no longer apply…

One Jason Roe (a web developer by trade), put a post on his blog claiming he’d found a way to cheat certain pricing elements on the Ryanair website.

The following chain of events could be categorised as unfortunate, but they do clearly demonstrate how certain brands simply do not understand how to engage with their customers in a relevant and meaningful way in the digital space.

As yet unnamed Ryanair staff responded (quite negatively) to his blog post. This included calling him a liar, telling him they could hack his site and do what they wanted with it, the list goes on.

Not the most customer friendly response…

In the olden days we had the old adage of a good experience being shared with two or three close friends, and a bad experience being shared by eight or nine. These days however, the potential for an irate customers to spread the word are almost infinite.

After being picked up in the press, the official Ryanair response was;

‘Ryanair can confirm that a Ryanair staff member did engage in a blog discussion. It is Ryanair policy not to waste time and energy corresponding with idiot bloggers and Ryanair can confirm that it won’t be happening again’.

Again, a clear demonstration that the brand ands its stewards do not understand the potential of the web, and the damage just a few individuals can very quickly wreak on the brand.

What started as an innocent blog post first set the blogosphere alight.

It was then picked up by the press, the fallout from the official response picking up even more column inches. All the while there are tweets a plenty, facebook on fire. The list goes on, all adding fuel to the fire…

The blog was the tip of the iceberg.

As this grew, the negative perception of the brand travelled at speed with it. Jason’s blog alone has 450 comments at last count. Now, factor in the way this has travelled across the social networks, email, the wider media.

The potential for this single negative brand experience to be swiftly shared with many and prolong the damage to the brand is truly enormous. We’re certainly talking a lot more than the eight or nine people we used to share a negative experience with in the ‘good old days’.

Smart brands engage. Provide a forum where irate customers can vent. But what separates the wheat from the chaff? The brands that use that very forum as a space to deal with the issues presented.

Turning that negative into a positive, ensuring angry consumers don’t ‘do a Jason Roe’, instead re-invigorating their love for your brand / product, ensuring they remain a true brand ambassador. And preferably spreading the good word.  

With a little careful management and a considered response from HQ, this could have been dealt with very, very quickly.

However, it was closely followed up with the negative press surrounding the possibility of people having to spend £1.00 to use Ryanairs’ onboard toilets.

Another PR clanger.

And as such, the Jason Roe story rumbles on, all the while leaving the hangar doors open to more negative brand exposure. I think it’s fair to say this hasn’t been the best week for Ryanair…

Iain Morrison is a senior marketer in the British Tourism Industry. Whilst his personal views don’t reflect that of his organisation, I can’t imagine there are too many of us out there keen to spend a pound in order to spend a penny.

Idiot blogger signing off… 

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Facebook climbdown…

spy

spy

It’s embarrassing.

For a brand that empowers its users in such a way they can instantly unite against against the ‘enemy’, issue a rallying cry to the like-minded and deploy the troops with amazing speed, you’d think facebook would know a lot better than to try changing the privacy rules by the back door…

I managed a textbook case of this in 2008 (when an international bank with local aspirations their ads would have you believe), and they did what most big brands chose to do. Ignore the facebookers, they can’t damage my brand, it’ll blow over in a few days. Against all my advice, the brand dug in, only to suffer at the hands of the mobilised minority.

After it hit the BBC 6 o’clock news a day or two later, a rather hasty about turn was arranged…

So facebook. A brand that provides the very battlefield, that truly gets the potential of 2.0 (having harnessed it from day one), should have known better than to bite the hand that feeds it. That of its users.

A foolhardy situation the board should have seen coming a mile off. An alienated user base will now watch its every move, and cry foul the moment they put so much as a privacy related foot out of line.

It wasn’t a smart move, deletion of a profile in the users eyes means everything comes off. A brand that prides itself on the sense of ‘community’ it facilitates really shouldn’t have scored this type of own goal, however great the need to further monetise the site is…

The privacy battle will rage on.

But I can’t help but feel if brands use consumers personal data to bring information / content / advertising / offers to them that is of genuine interest, they won’t mind a jot…

After all, it worked for Tesco…

Iain Morrison is a senior marketer in the British Tourism Industry. And would encourage brand managers to watch what happened to facebook. It’s probably happening to your brand right about NOW!

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